What would happen if you didn’t sleep? - Claudia Aguirre

TED-Ed · 6,107,403 Просмотры
View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-would-happen-if-you-didn-t-sleep-claudia-aguirre

In the United States, it’s estimated that 30 percent of adults and 66 percent of adolescents are regularly sleep-deprived. This isn’t just a minor inconvenience: staying awake can cause serious bodily harm. Claudia Aguirre shows what happens to your body and brain when you skip sleep.

Lesson by Claudia Aguirre, animation by TED-Ed.

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Why are some people left-handed? - Daniel M. Abrams

Why are some people left-handed? - Daniel M. Abrams

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-are-some-people-left-handed-daniel-m-abrams

Today, about one-tenth of the world’s population are southpaws. Why are such a small proportion of people left-handed -- and why does the trait exist in the first place? Daniel M. Abrams investigates how the uneven ratio of lefties and righties gives insight into a balance between competitive and cooperative pressures on human evolution.

Lesson by Daniel M. Abrams, animation by TED-Ed.
Can Silence Actually Drive You Crazy?

Can Silence Actually Drive You Crazy?

*Watch with headphones on!
Is 45 minutes really the longest anyone can stay in a perfectly silent, pitch-black room?
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Want to watch the whole hour of silence? http://youtu.be/jr1UMFC9DV0

Many stories have circulated claiming the longest anyone has stayed in an ultra-quiet anechoic chamber is 45 minutes, the reason being any longer would drive you insane. To me this sounded like unsubstantiated rubbish, like the claim the Great Wall is the only manmade structure visible from space. So I put my own psyche on the line, subjecting myself to over an hour of the most intense quiet on Earth. No, this was not THE quietest room on Earth (-9dB) but it is one of the quietest, and the truth is once you put a person inside, they are by far the loudest thing in there so the sound rating of the room is irrelevant.

I was not surprised to find that I could stay in there for as long as I liked and feel perfectly fine. What was surprising is that my heartbeat was audible. You can hear it on the sound recording. Now I wasn't consciously aware of the sound of my heart while in the room, but I was more aware of the feeling of it beating.

Huge thank you to everyone at BYU: Duane Merrell, Spencer Perry, Cameron Vongsawad, Jazz Myers, Ann Clawson, and Robert Willes.
Why don't perpetual motion machines ever work? - Netta Schramm

Why don't perpetual motion machines ever work? - Netta Schramm

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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-don-t-perpetual-motion-machines-ever-work-netta-schramm

Perpetual motion machines — devices that can do work indefinitely without any external energy source — have captured many inventors’ imaginations because they could totally transform our relationship with energy. There’s just one problem: they don’t work. Why not? Netta Schramm describes the pitfalls of perpetual motion machines.

Lesson by Netta Schramm, animation by TED-Ed.
Is Height All In Our Genes?

Is Height All In Our Genes?

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I’m tall. Most of the people in my family are tall. Does that mean my son will be tall? Turns out the inheritance of height is a lot more complicated than we thought. Scientists know that nature (genes) and nurture (environment) both play a role, but after more than a century of questions, we’re only just now starting to get some answers

REFERENCES:

Fryar, C.D. et al. (2016). Anthropometric reference data for
children and adults: United States, 2011–2014. National Center for Health
Statistics. Vital Health Stat 3(39).

NCD Risk Factor Collaboration. (2016). A century of trends in adult human height. eLife
5:e13410.

Visscher, P.M. et al. (2007). Genome partitioning of genetic variation for height from 11,214 sibling pairs. American Journal of Human Genetics 81:1104–10.

Zimmer, C. (2018). She has her mother’s laugh: The powers, perversions, and potential of heredity. New York: Dutton. http://bit.ly/2xi5H0M

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Why do cats act so weird? - Tony Buffington

Why do cats act so weird? - Tony Buffington

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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-do-cats-act-so-weird-tony-buffington

They’re cute, they’re lovable, and judging by the 26 billion views on over 2 million YouTube videos of them, one thing is certain: cats are very entertaining. But their strange feline behaviors, both amusing and baffling, leave many of us asking: Why do cats do that? Tony Buffington explains the science behind some of your cat’s strangest behaviors.

Lesson by Tony Buffington, animation by Chintis Lundgren.