The 116 images NASA wants aliens to see

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Here are all the photos flying through interstellar space on Voyager's Golden Record. http://www.vox.com/2015/11/11/9702090/voyager-golden-record-pictures

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Sources:
http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/spacecraft/scenes.html
http://www.amazon.com/Pale-Blue-Dot-Vision-Future/dp/0345376595
http://www.amazon.com/Murmurs-Earth-Carl-Sagan-ebook/dp/B00BRUQ4HK/ref=sr_1_1

When Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 launched into space in 1977, their mission was to explore the outer solar system, and over the following decade, they did so admirably.

With an 8-track tape memory system and onboard computers that are thousands of times weaker than the phone in your pocket, the two spacecraft sent back an immense amount of imagery and information about the four gas giants, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

But NASA knew that after the planetary tour was complete, the Voyagers would remain on a trajectory toward interstellar space, having gained enough velocity from Jupiter's gravity to eventually escape the grasp of the sun. Since they will orbit the Milky Way for the foreseeable future, the Voyagers should carry a message from their maker, NASA scientists decided.

The Voyager team tapped famous astronomer and science popularizer Carl Sagan to compose that message. Sagan's committee chose a copper phonograph LP as their medium, and over the course of six weeks they produced the "Golden Record": a collection of sounds and images that will probably outlast all human artifacts on Earth.

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Voyager I : 1977 - 2019 [ The Journey Continues ]

Voyager I : 1977 - 2019 [ The Journey Continues ]

A short documentary by SuperNova Films.

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Why China is building islands in the South China Sea

Why China is building islands in the South China Sea

China claims they aren't military bases, but their actions say otherwise.

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China is building islands in the South China sea and its causing disputes among the other nations in the region; Malaysia, the Philippines, Brunei, Vietnam, and Indonesia. The US has many allies in the region and uses its massive Navy to patrol international waters, keeping shipping lanes open for trade

To truly understand the international conflicts and trends shaping our world you need a big-picture view. Video journalist Sam Ellis uses maps to tell these stories and chart their effects on foreign policy.

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Your kids might live on Mars. Here's how they'll survive | Stephen Petranek

Your kids might live on Mars. Here's how they'll survive | Stephen Petranek

It sounds like science fiction, but journalist Stephen Petranek considers it fact: within 20 years, humans will live on Mars. In this provocative talk, Petranek makes the case that humans will become a spacefaring species and describes in fascinating detail how we'll make Mars our next home. "Humans will survive no matter what happens on Earth," Petranek says. "We will never be the last of our kind."

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5 Fun Facts You Probably Never Knew

5 Fun Facts You Probably Never Knew

Think you know where salmon sushi comes from? How about the origins of the aluminum ball challenge? Accept our challenge and see if you know these five fun facts.

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Why ships used this camouflage in World War I

Why ships used this camouflage in World War I

Dazzle camouflage was fantastically weird. It was also surprisingly smart.

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Dazzle camouflage was a surprisingly effective defense against torpedoes. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explains why.


World War I ships faced a unique problem. The u-boat was a new threat at the time, and its torpedoes were deadly. That led artist Norman Wilkinson to come up with dazzle camouflage (sometimes called “razzle dazzle camouflage”). The idea was to confuse u-boats about a ship’s course, rather than try to conceal its presence. In doing so, dazzle camouflage could keep torpedoes from hitting the boat — and that and other strategies proved a boon in World War I.


This camouflage is unusual, but its striking appearance influenced the culture, inspired cubist painters’ riffs, and even entered into the world of fashion. Though dazzle camouflage lost its utility once radar and other detection techniques took over from u-boat periscopes, for a brief period in time it was an effective and unusual way to help ships stay safe.

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