Sounds of Mars: NASA’s InSight Senses Martian Wind

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory · 2,388,757 Просмотры
Listen to Martian wind blow across NASA’s InSight lander. The spacecraft’s seismometer and air pressure sensor picked up vibrations from 10-15 mph (16-24 kph) winds as they blew across Mars’ Elysium Planitia on Dec. 1, 2018.

The seismometer readings are in the range of human hearing, but are nearly all bass and difficult to hear on laptop speakers and mobile devices. We provide the original audio and a version pitched up by two octaves to make them audible on mobile devices. Playback is suggested on a sound system with a subwoofer or through headphones. Readings from the air pressure sensor have been sped up by a factor of 100 times to make them audible. For full-length uncompressed .wav files, visit NASA.gov/sounds

For more about the InSight mission, visit mars.nasa.gov/insight .

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/CNES/IPGP/Imperial College/Cornell

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TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more.
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What Huygens Saw On Titan - New Image Processing

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My photos: https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/105656643463219506384/+aheli

DVD - Roving Mars 2006 : Spirit, Opportunity, and the Exploration of the Red Planet @ amazon.com http://www.amazon.com/Roving-Mars-Spirit-Opportunity-Exploration/dp/B003XU7W0A

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From Wiki : Spirit, MER-A (Mars Exploration Rover -- A), is a robotic rover on Mars, active from 2004 to 2010. It was one of two rovers of NASA's ongoing Mars Exploration Rover Mission. It landed successfully on Mars at 04:35 Ground UTC on January 4, 2004, three weeks before its twin, Opportunity (MER-B), landed on the other side of the planet. Its name was chosen through a NASA-sponsored student essay competition. The rover became stuck in late 2009, and its last communication with Earth was sent on March 22, 2010.
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Narration Voice: Bernard Oattes

Technical Experts: Stephane Ghiste, Dmitriy Churkin (HSO-UT)

Content Design: Stephane Ghiste, Dmitriy Churkin, Raffaele Castellano, Matthew Day (HSO-UT)

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Special thanks to:
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Lionel Ferra (HSO-UT)
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Frank De Winne (HSO-A)
Paolo Nespoli (HSO-A)
Antonio Rodenas Bosque (HSO-UT)
NASA
ROSCOSMOS
S.P. Korolev Rocket and Space Corporation Energia
Aerospace Search and Rescue Service of the Russian Federation

Parachute footage: Cambridge University Spaceflight

Surfer footage: copyright Red Bull Media House

Footage from inside Soyuz capsule courtesy of RSC Energia has limited rights:

a) These data are submitted with Limited Rights under Agreement among the Government of Canada, Governments of Member States of the European Space Agency, the Government of Japan, the Government of the Russian Federation and the Government of the United States of America concerning co-operation on the civil International Space Station.

These data may be used by the receiving co-operating agency and its contractors and subcontractors, provided that such data shall be used, duplicated or disclosed only for the following purposes, which are related to the Cooperating Agency Space Station Program for ISS:
1) Use for ESA astronaut training
2) Use for educational purposes
These data shall not be used by persons or entities other than the receiving Cooperating Agency, its contractors or subcontractors, or for any other purposes, without the prior written permission of the furnishing partner state, acting through its cooperating agency.

b) This notice shall be marked on any reproduction of these data in whole or part.

Also watch:
Journey to the ISS Part 1: The launch sequence explained
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AVvgpKt5uCA

Watch Part 2: Soyuz rendezvous and docking explained
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2_NeFbFcSw

Captions available in English, French, German, Italian, Russian, Romanian (with thanks to Alexa Mirel) and Spanish. Click on the CC button to switch between languages.