Iceland Is Growing New Forests for the First Time in 1,000 Years | Short Film Showcase

National Geographic · 2,060,275 Просмотры
The landscape of Iceland has changed a lot in a thousand years. When the Vikings first arrived in the ninth century, the land was covered in 25 to 40 percent forest.
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The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the web and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic's belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners.

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Within a few centuries, almost all of the island’s trees were slashed and burned to make room for farming. This rapid deforestation has resulted in massive soil erosion that puts the island at risk for desertification.

Today, the Icelandic Forest Service has taken on the mammoth task of bringing back the woodlands. With the help of forestry societies and forest farmers, Iceland’s trees are slowly beginning to make a comeback. Watch this short film by Euforgen to learn more about how their efforts are working to benefit Iceland's economy and ecology through forestry.

Produced by Duckrabbit: http://www.duckrabbit.info/

Directed by Ewa Hermanowicz.: https://ehermanowicz.wordpress.com/

Euforgen: http://www.euforgen.org/about-us/news/news-detail/regreening-iceland/

Icelandic Forest Service: http://www.skogur.is/english

About National Geographic:
National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible.

Iceland Is Growing New Forests for the First Time in 1,000 Years | Short Film Showcase
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The six Vox Borders documentaries, presented by lululemon, are publishing weekly on Tuesdays.

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Haiti and the Dominican Republic share a border, and an island. But the two countries are very different today: the Dominican Republic enjoys higher quality of life for many factors than Haiti. I went to this island and visited both countries, to try and understand when and how their paths diverged. And I began to learn how those differences are playing out in the present.

Vox Borders is a new international documentary series presented by lululemon, by Emmy-nominated videojournalist Johnny Harris. For this series, Johnny is producing six 10-15 minute documentaries about different borders stories from around the world.

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Made in Israel: Agriculture

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Beautiful Tiny Turf House in Iceland - Full Tour & Interview

Beautiful Tiny Turf House in Iceland - Full Tour & Interview

In this video we tour a traditional Icelandic turf house at the Islenski Baerinn Turf House museum (http://islenskibaerinn.is/english/). Turf houses are the original green buildings because they were built using local and natural materials. In Southern Iceland they used turf from the local wetlands and lava stones to build thick walls that would insulate the houses against wind and cold weather. They imported small amounts of wood, or used driftwood.

Most turf houses in Iceland were torn down after World War II when people were encouraged to modernize their homes which means there are almost no turf houses left. So we felt really lucky to visit the Islenski Baerinn Turf House museum in Southern Iceland and meet with Hannes who runs the museum and whose grandparents and great grandparents used to live on, and run, the farm.

Traditional turf houses, and especially turf houses on farms were built in clusters so you'll see there's many houses all linked together. Only one of them is actually the living space where you'll find the beds. And then in the other houses you would find things like a horse stable or a food processing area, and they did this to take advantage of insulation from shared walls. Each house is joined together with hallways so that people could go from one area of the house to the other without having to go outside.

Inside the main home you can see that all of the beds were in one room and this was where everyone did all of their work, where they slept, where they ate, where they gave birth. Everything in an Icelanders life happened in this main living space and it really was communal living.

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Hannes completely restored this old farmstead with his wife and mother, and while he continued to use the traditional methods using the turf and the lava stones for the walls, he did use corrugated iron for some of the outer walls and some of the newer roofs.

It's really incredible to see how cozy and liveable these small spaces are even though they're built with such basic natural materials.

If you're interested in turf houses and green buildings (and if you're planning a visit to Iceland!), we would definitely recommend visiting the Islenski Baerinn Turf House museum - it was probably our favourite part of our trip!!! They have a website here if you want to learn more:
http://islenskibaerinn.is/english/

You can also follow them on Facebook, and Instagram:
https://www.facebook.com/islenskibaerinn
https://www.instagram.com/islenski_baerinn/

We also want to say a big thank you to Eyvi (Eyjólfur Eyjólfsson) who we met at the Vöðlakot cafe at the Islenski Baerinn Turf House Museum who fed us delicious coffee & home made pancakes, and who took the time to play his beautiful langspil instrument that you see and hear at the beginning of the video.

Thanks for watching!

Mat & Danielle

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Blog: www.exploringalternatives.ca
Facebook: /exploringalternativesblog
Instagram: @exploringalternatives

Music & Song Credits:
The music in this video was composed, performed, and recorded by Mat of Exploring Alternatives, except for the opening and closing song.

The opening and closing song in this video is called "Langspils-kvæðalag” and is partly folksong but mostly composed by Örn Magnusson. It was performed by Eyjólfur Eyjólfsson who we met at the Vöðlakot cafe at the Islenski Baerinn Turf House Museum.
Nebraska retiree uses earths's heat to grow oranges in snow

Nebraska retiree uses earths's heat to grow oranges in snow

Winter temperatures in Alliance, Nebraska can drop to -20°F (the record low is -40°F/C), but retired mailman Russ Finch grows oranges in his backyard greenhouse without paying for heat. Instead, he draws on the earth's stable temperature (around 52 degrees in his region) to grow warm weather produce- citrus, figs, pomegranates - in the snow.

Finch first discovered geothermal heating in 1979 when he and his wife built it into their 4400-square-foot dream home to cut energy costs. Eighteen years later they decided to add a 16'x80' greenhouse in the backyard. The greenhouse resembles a pit greenhouse (walipini) in that the floor is dug down 4 feet below the surface and the roof is slanted to catch the southern sun.

To avoid using heaters for the cold Nebraska winter nights, Finch relies on the warm underground air fed into the greenhouse via plastic tubing under the yard and one fan.

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https://greenhouseinthesnow.com/

https://faircompanies.com/videos/nebraska-retiree-uses-earthss-energy-to-grow-oranges-in-nebraska-cold/